Tag Archives: Privacy and Electronic Communications

Data Protection/Privacy Enforcement: August 2018

August was another quiet month in terms of the data protection and privacy enforcement action published by the Information Commissioner’s Office. There were just two Monetary Penalty Notices published by the ICO last month. There are still a few key points to draw from last month’s published enforcement action – some of which are featured fairly regularly on these monthly blogposts, but are worthy of repitition.

Key Points

  • When carrying out direct marketing by telephone it is important that you check the intended list against the list held by the Telephone Preference Service before undertaking the campaign. If any number you intend on calling appears on that list you must satisfy yourself that you have sufficient evidence to support that you can still call that number, despite it being on the TPS.
  • If you’re getting your telephone lists from a third party then you must still do your own due diligence. Ensure that you have received sufficient evidence from the seller that the persons on the list have, in fact, indicated that they don’t mind being marketed to.
  • When drafting a privacy notice which sets out that you may share personal data with third parties it is important to be as accurate and precise as possible. It is not enough to include something along the lines of that you will share personal data with “carefully selected partners” and if you have a detailed list of organisations (or categories of organisations) that you may share personal data with, it is important that you do not share personal data with third parties who do not fall within that list.

Enforcement action published by the ICO in August 2018

AMS Marketing Limited
AMS Marketing Limited was served with a Monetary Penalty Notice in the amount of £100,000 [pdf] after if breached Regulation 21 of the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003. AMS Marketing had made in excess of 75,000 calls to numbers which were listed with the Telephone Preference Service and were unable to demonstrate to the Commissioner that they had been notified by the subscriber that they did not object, for the time being, to receiving calls for the purpose of direct marketing.

Lifecycle Marketing (Mother and Baby) Ltd
Life Style Marketing (Mother and Baby) Ltd (also known as ‘Emma’s Diary’) was served with a Monetary Penalty Notice in the amount of £140,000 after it failed to comply with the first data protection principle in Schedule 1 to the Data Protection Act 1998 (“DPA1998”). The company sold the personal data of more than 1 million individuals to the Labour Party for use in its campaign during the General election that took place in 2017 without telling those individuals that this is something that it might do with their personal data. The company, the Commissioner found, had no lawful basis within Schedule 2 of the DPA1998 for processing the personal data of those individuals.

Alistair Sloan

If you require advice and assistance in connection with any of the data protection/privacy issues above, or any other Information Law matter, please do contact Alistair Sloan on 0141 229 0880 or by sending him an E-mail directly.  You can also follow our dedicated information law twitter account.

 

 

Privacy and Data Protection: director disqualified

In September 2017 the Information Commissioner served a Monetary Penalty Notice on Easyleads Limited in the amount of £260,000 [pdf]; the company was also served with an Enforcement Notice by the Commissioner requiring the company to comply with the terms of the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 [pdf]. It has since transpired that the company never paid the monetary penalty notice and the Information Commissioner petitioned the court to have the company wound-up. It is not unheard of for monetary penalty notices served by the Commissioner to go unpaid; however, where they do it is often because the company goes into liquidation. A copy of the order winding the company up following the petition by the Information Commissioner [pdf] can be found on the Companies House website.

What is interesting about this case though is an announcement by the Insolvency Service that the Secretary of State had accepted a disqualification undertaking from Shaun Harkin, the director of Easyleads Limited. The effect of the undertaking is to ban Mr. Harkin from “directly or indirectly becoming involved, without the permission of the court, in the promotion, formation or management of a company for six years”.

The announcement from the insolvency Service explains that the reason Mr Harkin is now banned from being a director of a company for 6 years is because he failed to ensure that the company complied with its statutory obligations, specifically that he failed to ensure that the company complied with the requirements of the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 around undertaking direct marketing by telephone.

This is an important announcement from the Insolvency Service; it demonstrates that the effects of failing to comply with data protection and privacy law can be wide-ranging. There is the potential for directors running companies which fail to comply with data protection and privacy law facing being banned from being involved in the formation or management of companies for a not insignificant period of time. It remains to be seen whether this sort of action becomes much more frequent and it is not something that is directly in the control of the Information Commissioner herself, but if the Insolvency Service is starting to take seriously breaches of data protection and privacy law by companies and looking to disqualify directors (where it can within the parameters of the law) then this is clearly something that those involved in the formation and management of limited companies ought to bear in mind when considering data protection and privacy compliance.

Alistair Sloan

If you require advice or assistance on a matter relating to data protection or privacy law then you can contact Alistair Sloan on 0141 229 0880 or send him an E-mail. You can also follow our twitter account dedicated to information law matters.

PECR: The forgotten relative

Much of the focus in relation to data protection and privacy law is on implementation of the Genera Data Protection Regulation, which becomes applicable from 25 May 2018.  However, many of the discussions that are taking place in respect of GDPR implementation are forgetting the GDPR’s older cousin:  the snappily named Directive 2002/58/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 12 July 2002 concerning the processing of personal data and the protection of privacy in the electronic communications sector (Directive on privacy and electronic communications).  This Directive from the European Union dating from 2002 was implemented in the United Kingdom through the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003 (“PECR”).

 The Directive on privacy and electronic communications is concerned with the processing of personal data and the protection of privacy in the electronic communications sector and is of importance to telecommunications providers, Internet Service Providers and any person or organisation who conducts direct marketing by electronic means; however, this blog post is concerned only with direct marketing and is a follow-up to my recent blog post on whether consent is required under the GDPR.

The GDPR might be the big thing at the moment, but it is important not to consider it in isolation.  When thinking about GDPR implementation it is necessary to take a holistic view and think about how it interacts with other laws because these other laws don’t stop having effect just because of the GDPR.  Therefore, it is essential to consider how these other laws affect your GDPR implementation.

The rules on direct marketing by electronic means are relatively simple and straightforward, but this does not stop unlawful behaviour from taking place on an industrial scale.  Rarely does a month go past without the Information Commissioner’s Office publishing information on enforcement action it has taken against businesses arising out of failing to comply with PECR, especially since the law changed to lower the legal threshold for Monetary Penalty Notices in relation to PECR infringements.

Electronic Mail
Electronic Mail includes E-mail and SMS text messaging.  The general rule for direct marketing by electronic mail is that you need consent, as defined by the 1995 Data Protection Directive.  This means that you must have a freely given, specific and informed indication that the person to whom you are directing the marketing wants to receive such marketing.

There is an exception to this which is referred to as the “soft opt-in”.  This applies where you have obtained a person’s personal data “in the course of the sale or negotiations for the sale of a product or service” to them.  You can then send direct marketing to this person, without first gaining their express consent, where you are marketing your own similar products or services.  The data subject must be “given a simple means of refusing (free of charge except for the costs of the transmission of the refusal) the use of his contact details for the purposes of such direct marketing, at the time that the details were initially collected”.

Each direct marketing communication that is sent must include a simple means of opt-out of further direct marketing content (and this must be free of charge, except for the costs of transmission of the opt-out).

Telephone:  Automated calls
The rules for direct marketing by telephone are split into automated and unsolicited live telesales calls.  In the case of automated calls with recorded information played when the phone line being called is answered, the subscriber (i.e. the person who has contracted with the telephone service provider) must have notified the caller (or the person instigating the call where the caller is a third party acting on behalf of the instigator) that, for the time being, they consent to receiving such calls.  Again, this requires there to be a freely given, specific and informed indication.  Consent can be withdrawn.

Telephone:  Unsolicited live telesales calls
You do not require consent to make such calls; however, you must not make such calls where the subscriber has notified you that they do not wish to receive such calls, or if the number is registered with the Telephone Preference Service (TPS).  You can call numbers registered with the TPS where the subscriber has consented to receiving calls from you, notwithstanding that the number is registered with the TPS.  Consent can, as always, be withdrawn at a later date.

Fax
Yes, it is still a thing and some people (and indeed whole sectors) still use fax machines.  However, as it is more or less an obsolete technology all I will say on the matter is that PECR regulates the use of fax for direct marketing and the relevant parts are Regulations 20 and 25.

That is a very brief run through of the relevant law as it stands today.  However, a couple of points to note in closing:  Firstly, the EU is currently working on a replacement to the current Directive.  It had been anticipated that the new E-Privacy Regulation would be implemented alongside the GDPR, but work started on it too late and so it won’t.  Whether it will be finalised in and in force prior to Brexit is something that we will need to wait and see.  Secondly, depending on what happens with the Brexit negotiations it may still end up being part of UK law even if it comes into force after the UK leaves the EU.  Thirdly, there is likely to be some temporary adjustments to PECR from 25 May 2018, that is because PECR adopts a lot of definitions from the Data Protection Act 1998 and the 1995 Data Protection Directive (both of which will be repealed on 25 May 2018).  Finally, the domestic Regulations were made under the European Communities Act 1972; therefore the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill may well have some impact upon them.

Alistair Sloan

If you would like advice or assistance with a privacy or data protection matter, or any other information law concern then contact Alistair Sloan on 0345 450 0123 or send him an E-mail.

Data Protection/Privacy Enforcement: November 2017

A bit later than normal, it is time for our monthly review of the enforcement action taken by the Information Commissioner in respect of Privacy and Data Protection matters during the month of November 2017.  This follows on from our reviews covering September 2017 and October 2017.

Key Points

  • Ensure that when you are collecting personal data that you are clear and open about what it will be used for.  If it is to be supplied to third parties for direct marketing purposes state as accurately as possible who those third parties are –  stating that it will be shared with “carefully selected partners” is not going to be sufficient.
  • When undertaking direct marketing by electronic means, such as by E-mail or text message, ensure that you have in place the necessary consent (and remember the definition of consent in the Data Protection Directive) of the recipient before sending your marketing messages.
  • Once again, if you have access to personal data as part of your employment, ensure that you only access it where there is a legitimate business need for you to do so.  Do not send personal data to your own personal E-mail address without first explaining to your employer why you need to do it and getting their consent to do so.

Enforcement action published by the ICO in November 2017

Verso Group (UK) Limited

Verso Group (UK) Limited was served with a Monetary Penalty Notice [pdf] in the amount of £80,000.  Verso had been supplying personal data to third parties to enable those third parties to conduct direct marketing campaigns; the Commissioner considered that Verso had breached the First Data Protection Principle in doing so.  This was because the Commissioner did not consider that the terms and conditions and privacy policies of Verso and those other companies from which it obtained personal data were clear enough to make the processing by Verso fair and lawful.

Hamilton Digital Solutions Limited

Hamilton Digital Solutions Limited were served with an Enforcement Notice [pdf] and a Monetary Penalty Notice [pdf] in the amount of £45,000 after the company were responsible for the sending of in excess of 150,000 text messages for the purposes of direct marketing in breach of the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003.

Prosecutions

There were a number of successful prosecutions reported by the ICO during the month of November 2017:

Prosecution 1 –
A former employee of a community based counselling charity was prosecuted by the ICO at Preston Crown Court and pleaded guilty to three charges under Section 55 of the Data Protection Act 1998.  The Defendant had sent a number of E-mails to his personal E-mail address which contained sensitive personal data of clients, without his employers’ consent.  He was given a 2 year Conditional Discharge, ordered to pay costs of £1,845.25 and a £15 Victim Surcharge.

Prosecution 2 –
An employee of Dudley Group NHS Trust pleaded guilty two offences under Section 55 of the Data Protection Act 1998:  one of unlawfully obtaining personal data and one of unlawfully disclosing personal data.  The defendant had accessed the medical records of a neighbour and former friend medical records and also disclosed information about a baby.  She was fined a total of £250 (£125 for each offence) and was ordered to pay prosecution costs amounting to £500 and a victim surcharge of £30.

Prosecution 3 –
A former nursing auxiliary at the Royal Gwent Hospital in Newport was fined £232 for offences under Section 55 of the Data Protection Act 1998.  She was also ordered to pay prosecution costs of £150 and a victim surcharge of £30.  The Defendant had unlawfully accessed the records of a patient who was also her neighbour

Alistair Sloan

If you require advice and assistance in connection with any of the issues above, or any other Information Law matter, please do contact Alistair on 0345 450 0123 or by completing the form on the contact page of this blog.  Alternatively, you can send him an E-mail directly.

Data Protection/Privacy Enforcement: October 2017

Continuing the regular monthly look at Data Protection and Privacy enforcement taken by the Information Commissioner, this blog post reviews the enforcement action published during October 2017.

Key Points

  • When seeking consent for the purposes of direct marketing, be clear and precise in the language that you use.
  • When buying-in lists of contact details for the purpose of Direct Marketing you are responsible for ensuring that the there is valid consent in place so carry out your own due-diligence.
  • You are responsible for the direct marketing calls made by your agent as you are the instigator of the calls
  • If you have access to personal data as part of your job, do not access it unless you have a valid reason to do so in connection with your employment.

Enforcement Action published by ICO in October 2017

Xerpla Limited

Xerpla Limited was served with a Monetary Penalty Notice [pdf] in the amount of £50,000 after the Information Commissioner found that they had sent more than 1 million unsolicited direct marketing communications by electronic mail.  The Information Commissioner considered that Xerpla was not clear or specific enough about who subscribers were agreeing to receive marketing from.

Vanquis Bank Limited

Vanquis Bank Limited were served with an Monetary Penalty Notice [pdf] in the amount of £75,00 and an Enforcement Notice [pdf] after the Information Commissioner found that they had sent text messages and E-mails marketing credit cards without consent.

The Lead Experts Limited

The Lead Experts Limited were served with a Monetary Penalty Notice [pdf] in the amount of £70,000 and an Enforcement Notice [pdf] after the Information Commissioner found that they had instigated automated marketing calls to telephone subscribers without the subscriber’s consent.

Prosecutions

A former employee of Kent and Medway NHS and Social Care Partnership Trust was fined £300, ordered to pay prosecution costs of £364.08 and a victim surcharge of £30 after pleading guilty to an offence under the Data Protection Act 1998.  The defendant had accessed the health records of a single patient 279 times over a three-week period in October and November 2015, viewing the files up to 50 times in a day.  The patient was known to the defendant, but she had no valid lawful reason to access the records and did so without her employer’s consent.

Alistair Sloan

If you require advice and assistance in connection with any of the issues above, or any other Information Law matter, please do contact Alistair on 0345 450 0123 or by completing the form on the contact page of this blog.  Alternatively, you can send me an E-mail directly.

Data Protection/Privacy Enforcement: September 2017

Following on from last month’s post looking at the Data Protection/Privacy Enforcement taken in August 2017, it is now time to review what data protection/privacy enforcement the ICO publicised during September 2017.

Key Points

The key points from the enforcement action publicised by the ICO during the course of September are:

  • Ensure that where your organisation undertakes direct marketing by telephone, you do not make calls to numbers which are listed on the Telephone Preference Service; unless you have been given consent to make such calls.
  • Before you engage in a marketing campaign by making automated telephone calls, ensure that you have consent from the subscribers to the numbers that you intend to call, whether the numbers are registered with the telephone Preference Service or not.
  • Generally you require the consent of the recipient before you can send marketing materials by electronic means (including text messages and E-mail).
  • It is important that all employees (including agency and temporary staff) have an adequate level of data protection training for their job role and that there is in place ongoing refresher training on a regular basis.
  • If you are an employee and have access to personal data as part of your job role, do not make use of that access for any purposes not required as part of your employment; including for personal purposes.  Also, don’t forward personal data to your personal E-mail, for any reason, unless your employer has agreed to it first.

Enforcement Action published by ICO in August 2017

True Telecom Limited

True Telecom Limited were served with a Monetary Penalty Notice [pdf] in the amount of £85,000 and an Enforcement Notice [pdf] after the Commissioner had found that True Telecom was responsible for 201 unsolicited telephone calls for the purposes of direct marketing made to numbers registered with the Telephone Preference Service, contrary to the requirements of the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003.

Cab Guru Limited

Cab Guru Limited were served with a Monetary Penalty Notice [pdf] in the amount of £45,000 after the Commissioner found that it had instigated the transmission of more than 350,000 text messages for the purposes of direct marketing without having the consent of the intended recipient to do so, contrary to the requirements of the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003.

Your Money Rights Limited

Your Money Rights Limited were served with a Monetary Penalty Notice [pdf] in the amount of £350,000 after the Commissioner found that it had instigated more than 146,000,000 automated marketing calls without having the consent of the subscribers to the number(s), contrary to the requirements of the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003.

Easy Leads Limited

Easy Leads Limited were served with a Monetary Penalty Notice [pdf] in the amount of £208,000 and an Enforcement Notice [pdf] after the Commissioner found that the company had instigated more than 16,500,000 automated marketing telephone calls without having the consent of the subscribers to the numbers, contrary to the requirements of the Privacy and Electronic Communications (EC Directive) Regulations 2003.

Dyfed Powys Police

The Chief Constable of Dyfed Powys Police signed an undertaking [pdf] to ensure compliance with the seventh data protection principle after a number of breach incidents occurred which highlighted that many of the force’s police officers had received no data protection training and that there was no refresher training in place either.  The Commissioner did not take formal enforcement action against Dyfed Powys Police on the basis of remedial actions which had already been taken by the controller.

Prosecutions

A former employee of The University Hospitals of North Midlands NHS Trust was prosecuted at North Staffordshire Magistrates’ Court for an offence under Section 55 of the Data Protection Act 1998. The former employee accessed the sensitive medical records of colleagues as well as people she knew that lived in her locality, without the consent of the data controller. The defendant entered a plea of guilty and was fined £700, ordered to pay costs of £364.08 and a Victim Surcharge in the amount of £70.

A former employee of Leicester City Council was convicted of an offence under Section 55 of the Data Protection Act 1998 at Nuneaton Magistrates’ Court after he unlawfully obtained personal data.  The defendant emailed personal data relating to 349 individuals, which included sensitive personal data of service users of the Adult Social Care Department, to his personal email address without his employers’ consent.  He was fined £160, ordered to pay £364.08 prosecution costs and a victim surcharge in the amount of £20.

Alistair Sloan

If you require advice and assistance in connection with any of the issues above, or any other Information Law matter, please do contact Alistair on 0345 450 0123 or by completing the form on the contact page of this blog.  Alternatively, you can send me an E-mail directly.

Data Protection/Privacy Enforcement – August 2017

In this blogpost I shall be looking at the enforcement action taken by the Information Commissioner in the fields of data protection and privacy which was publicised during August 2017.  It is hoped that this will become a regular monthly feature on this blog.

Key Points

The key points from the enforcement action publicised by the ICO during the course of August are:

  • Ensure that where your organisation undertakes direct marketing by telephone, you do not make calls to numbers which are listed on the Telephone Preference Service; unless you have been given consent to make such calls.
  • Ensure that contractors who have access to personal data only have access to that personal data which is necessary for the services that they are providing to you.
  • Ensure that you have appropriate technical and organisational measures in places to prevent the unauthorised or unlawful processing of personal data when processing personal data over the internet.
  • Ensure that all of your staff (including temporary and agency staff) are given data protection training which is appropriate to their job role, and to ensure that regular refresher training is undertaken.
  • If you are an employee and have access to personal data as part of your job role, do not make use of that access for any purposes not required as part of your employment; including for personal purposes.

Enforcement Action published by ICO in August 2017

H.P.A.S Limited (trading as Safestyle UK)

H.P.A.S Limited were served with a Monetary Penalty Notice [pdf] in the amount of £70,000 and an Enforcement Notice [pdf] after the Commissioner found that they had made unsolicited direct marketing calls to telephone numbers which were listed on the Telephone Preference Service.

Laura Anderson Limited t/a Virgo Home Improvements

Laura Anderson Limited were served with a Monetary Penalty Notice [PDF] in the amount of £80,000 and an Enforcement Notice [pdf] after the Commissioner found that they had made unsolicited direct marketing calls to telephone numbers which were listed on the Telephone Preference Service.

Home Logic UK Limited

Home Logic UK Limited were served with a Monetary Penalty Notice [pdf] in the amount of £50,000 after the Commissioner found that they had made unsolicited direct marketing calls to telephone numbers which were listed on the Telephone Preference Service.

Talk Talk Telecom Group Plc

Talk Talk Telecom Group Plc were served with a Monetary Penalty Notice [pdf] in the amount of £100,000.  The Commissioner found that they had failed to have in place adequate technical and organisational measures to prevent against the unauthorised or unlawful processing of personal data.  Talk Talk Telecom Group Plc had in place unjustifiably wide-ranging access to personal data by external agents, which put that personal data at risk.

London Borough of Islington

The London Borough of Islington was served with a Monetary Penalty Notice [pdf] in the amount of £70,000.  The Commissioner found that the Borough’s parking enforcement application had design flaws and some of the functionality was misconfigured, allowing for unauthorised access to personal data.

Nottinghamshire County Council

Nottinghamshire County Council was served with a Monetary Penalty Notice [pdf] in the amount of £70,000.  The Commissioner found that the Council had failed to have in place an authentication process for accessing an internet based allocation service for home carers; this left personal data and sensitive personal data exposed on the internet.

Cheshire West and Chester Council

Cheshire West and Chester Council signed an undertaking [pdf] stating that they would take certain steps to ensure compliance with the Data Protection Act 1998.  In particular the Commissioner was concerned that a number of self-reported incidents by the council involved staff who had not received data protection training.

Prosecution

A former employee of Colchester Hospital University NHS Foundation Trust was prosecuted in The Colchester Magistrates’ Court.  The Defendant pleaded guilty to offences under Section 55 of the Data Protection Act 1998.  She had accessed the sensitive health records of friends and people she knew and disclosed some of the personal information she obtained obtained.  She was fined £400 for the offence of obtaining the personal data and £650 for the offence of disclosing the personal data.  She was also required to pay prosecution costs and a victim surcharge.

I can provide advice and assistance on a wide range of information law matters.  If you wish to discuss an information law matter with me then you can contact me on 0345 450 0123 or by completing the form on the contact page of this blog.  Alternatively, you can send me an E-mail directly.

Alistair Sloan

Welcome to the Information Law Blog by Inksters Solicitors

Welcome to the Information Law Blog from Inksters Solicitors.  On this blog we will be covering the latest issues in the areas of Data Protection/Privacy and also Freedom of Information.  Most of the contributions to this blog will be by Alistair Sloan, although there may be contributions from other members of the Inksters team from time to time.

Alistair is one our solicitors based in our Glasgow HQ; he offers legal services throughout Scotland in the field of information law, among others.   Alistair regulalry travels around Scotland and in particular visits our Caithness base in Wick on a frequent basis.  Alistair has been involved in the fields of freedom of information and data protection for a number of years, including prior to qualifying as a solicitor, and has built up a knowledge base on both areas throughout that time.  While studying for his Master of Laws degree, he researched the Information Commissioner’s use of Monetary Penalty Notices for breaches of the Data Protection Act 1998.

The area of information law is constantly developing.  The biggest change on the horizon is the General Data Protection Regulation, which will be applicable in the UK (and across the rest of the European Union) from 25 May 2018.  This new Regulation from the European Union represents the single biggest change to the laws relating to data protection and privacy in the UK in more than 20 years.

Much of the field of Information law is governed by EU law in one way or another, whether it be data protection or access to environmental information held by public authorities; therefore, the hot political subject of Brexit will feature heavily in the information law field over the coming years.

We’re not new to the world of information law; in 2016 our Sylvia MacLennan acted for the successful Petitioner in WF v Scottish Ministers.  This case challenged the position in Scotland where an accused person could seek access to the medical records of a complainer in a criminal case, but that the complainer was said not to have any standing to make representations directly to the court (including through their own solicitor) on the question of whether their medical records should be disclosed to the accused.  It also challenged the lack of availability of legal aid in Scotland to complainers concerning such issues.

We hope that this blog will become a useful resource for individuals to find out about the latest developments in the field of information law.  To keep up to date with this blog and what we are doing you can follow Alistair on twitter here; we also have a dedicated information law twitter account, which you can follow as well.

If you want to discuss an information law matter with Alistair you contact him on 0345 450 0123 or by completing the form on the contact page of this blog.  Alternatively, you can send him an E-mail directly.