Daily Archives: 16th May 2018

Data Protection Impact Assessments under the GDPR

Accountability is an important aspect of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).  The accountability principle in Article 5(2) of the GDPR obliges data controllers to be able to demonstrate that they are complying with the data protection principles in Article 5(1) of the GDPR.  Some of the technical requirements placed upon data controllers within the GDPR can be traced back, at least in part, to the accountability principle.  One of the requirements of the GDPR which will assist data controllers to demonstrate compliance with the data protection principles is the requirement to complete, in certain circumstances, a Data Protection Impact Assessment (DPIA).

For a number of years supervisory authorities around the EU, including the UK Information Commissioner, have encouraged organisations to conduct a Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) as part of their promotion of good data protection practice. DPIAs are simply PIAs by another name. The requirements for DPIAs are set out in Articles 35 and 36 of the GDPR.

When do I need to perform a DPIA?

Article 35(1) of the GDPR requires data controllers to conduct an assessment of the impact of envisaged processing operations on the protection of personal data, where a type of processing, in particular using new technologies; and taking into account the nature, scope, context and purposes of the processing, is likely to result in a high risk to the rights and freedoms of natural persons.  The DPIA must be conducted prior to undertaking the processing envisaged.

Article 35(3) sets out specific circumstances where a DPIA should be carried out by a data controller and those are:-

(a) a systematic and extensive evaluation of personal aspects relating to natural persons which is based on automated processing, including profiling, and on which decisions are based that produce legal effects concerning the natural person or similarly significantly affect the natural person;

(b) processing on a large scale of special categories of data referred to in Article 9(1), or of personal data relating to criminal convictions and offences referred to in Article 10; or

(c) a systematic monitoring of a publicly accessible area on a large scale.

When deciding whether a DPIA is required it will be important for data controllers to check the ICO’s website. The Information Commissioner is required to publish a list of the kind of processing operations which are subject to the requirement for a DPIA.  If the processing operations envisaged by a controller appear on this list, then they will be required to carry out a DPIA.  Article 35(5) also empowers the Information Commissioner (but does not require her) to establish and publish a list of the kind of processing operations for which no data protection impact assessment is required.

What does a DPIA require?

Article 35(7) sets out what the DPIA must include as a minimum; these are:-

  • a systematic description of the envisaged processing operations and the purposes of the processing, including, where applicable, the legitimate interest pursued by the controller
  • an assessment of the necessity and proportionality of the processing operations in relation to the purposes
  • an assessment of the risks to the rights and freedoms of data subjects (the risk to the rights and freedoms of natural persons, of varying likelihood and severity, may result from personal data processing which could lead to physical, material or non-material damage – see recital 75 of the GDPR for more detail)
  • the measures envisaged to address the risks, including safeguards, security measures and mechanisms to ensure the protection of personal data; and to demonstrate compliance with the GDPR taking into account the rights and legitimate interests of data subjects and other persons concerned

It should be noted that requirements set out in Article 35(7) for the content of a DPIA are a minimum; there may be situations when a DPIA requires to go beyond what is set above.

The role of the Data Protection Officer

If you have appointed a Data Protection Officer, then Article 35(2) of the GDPR requires that you seek advice from them when carrying out a DPIA. It should be remembered that a DPIA might change a number of time during the process; you should therefore keep your DPO involved throughout and be seeking advice from them regularly at appropriate junctures. Seeking advice from the DPO is not simply a box ticking exercise and should therefore not be treated as such. If you treat it as a simple box-ticking you could find yourself not complying properly with the requirements of the GDPR and could potentially be missing out on valuable advice. Remember that controllers are not obliged to follow the advice of their DPO, but if they elect to act contrary to that advice then they should document this and could be required to defend that decision.

The Role of The Information Commissioner

I have already indicated that the Information Commissioner has a role in the DPIA process, but her role is more extensive than has already been covered above. There are circumstances, set out in Article 36 of the GDPR, in which controllers will be required to consult with the ICO.  This applies where, in the absence of any mitigating measures by the controller, the DPIA indicates that the processing would result in a high risk to the rights and freedoms of data subjects.

Within a period of 8 weeks following receipt of the request for consultation (but this may be extended by a further 6 weeks in appropriate cases) the Information Commissioner is required to provide written advice to the controller where she is of the opinion that the intended processing would infringe this Regulation.  It’s therefore important that you consult the Commissioner well in advance of undertakng the envisaged processing to ensure that you have enough time to receive any written advice from the Commissioner and to consider and apply it.

The Information Commissioner’s role does not end there; she is not simply limited to giving written advice to the controller.  She can also become much more involved by conducting a data protection audit; issuing a formal warning that the intended processing is likely to infringe the provisions of the GDPR and even limit or prohibit (temporarily or indefinitely) a data controller from undertaking the proposed processing.

Penalties

A failure by a controller to comply with its obligations to conduct a DPIA where one is required can attract an administrative fine of up to €10,000,000 or 2% of global turnover (whichever is greater); as can a failure to consult with the Information Commissioner where consultation is required under Article 36 of the GDPR.  Failure to comply with an order limiting or prohibiting the processing (whether temporary or indefinite) can attract an administrative fine of up to €20,000,000 or 4% of global turnover (whichever is greater).

Can I undertake a DPIA when one is not required by the GDPR?

Yes you can; a properly completed DPIA will be of assistance to you in demonstrating that you are complying the the data protection principles. A DIPA on its own will usually be insufficient to completely comply with the Artcile 5(2) obligations (even where it is required by Article 35), but a properly completed DPIA is certainly something that you can produce to the Information Commissioner to help evidence that you are taking your data protection obligations seriously.

Alistair Sloan

If you require advice or assistance with Data Protection Impact Assessments or any other data protection matter then contact Alistair Sloan on 0141 229 0880 or by E-mail. Alistair can also assist with other aspects of information law.